Samantha Long talks about what it's like to be an Apprentice with Yoma..

Posted by Samantha Long

Digital Marketing Exec - Yoma

Thu 16th, Apr

Yoma are delighted to offer our Marketing whizz, Samantha Long, a big ‘congratulations’ on completion of her Advanced Level Apprenticeship in Marketing, while working at Yoma.

Digital Marketing Executive, Sam has been with us since July 2012, after applying for a job with us through the Liverpool Chamber of Commerce.

Since then, she has completed her Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Marketing and also Principles of Marketing Certificate, and developed her skills at Yoma to become a highly valued member of the Digital Marketing team.

So let’s hear from the lady herself about her journey with Yoma…

sam 2

When did you become interested in Marketing as a career?

I went to Ingeus looking for a role, who put me in touch with the Liverpool Chamber. It was then that I asked about an apprenticeship as a route into Digital Marketing.

When I first left school, I had a few sales jobs and then did a bit of admin work, before spotting an advert for the job at Yoma. I didn’t understand much about SEO, but I was really interested in the advertising and marketing side of it, so decided to get in touch.

How did you get your current role at Yoma?

The first job I got after leaving school was as a Trainee Data Technician, I found the role through a youth training scheme with Liverpool City Council. I was responsible for recording the geographical information for the city – and that’s what really got me into the technical side.

Then the second role I found was thanks to the Liverpool Chamber within the Marketing team at Yoma, where I learnt about SEO and then moved more into the PR side of things. This is is where I enjoy applying my technical skills and natural interest in this area.

So you were the first person ever to sign up to the Liverpool Chamber’s Marketing Apprenticeship?

Yes, they told me a little bit about it and I was interested so decided to give it a go. I was the first ever person they signed up for the Marketing Apprenticeship in Liverpool – so it’s a bit of a milestone for the Apprenticeship scheme, and for myself as well as Yoma!

What do you enjoy most about your job?

I really enjoy the creative aspect, plus being able to network with people all around the country in a variety of industries. I also like looking into market research and exploring the different ways marketing companies target their specific audience and demographic, and then also building relationships with relevant influencers on behalf of our clients.

And finally, how has the Advanced Level Apprenticeship in Marketing assisted you in your role?

Studying for my qualifications has armed me with a range of tools I use on a daily basis in my job. During my time on the course, I learnt skills such as how to utilise market resources for marketing to B2B and B2C.

This means I know how to define market segments and customer classifications, which helps me in my role to identify the right approach for our clients. And because I’ve enjoyed studying so much, I’m continuing to study in my spare time to learn about the latest methods and technologies in online marketing.

To find out more about what Sam does within her role, check out Yoma’s Digital Marketing services.

Original blog can be found at http://www.yoma.co.uk/blog/digital-marketing-exec-sams-success-story-yoma/

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Recent consultation outlines new approach to the role of trustees but does this act as a deterrent?

Posted by Graeme Hughes

Graeme Hughes is a solicitor in the Charities and Social Enterprise Department at Brabners LLP.

  • T: 0151 600 3079
Wed 15th, Apr

Towards the end of November last year, the Charity Commission published a consultation on a replacement for its core guidance for trustees, “CC3, The Essential Trustee”.

The consultation ran until February of this year. 114 responses were received.

Putting that into context, there are approximately 165,000 charities registered with the Commission as well as an estimated 190,000 unregistered charities (exempt or excepted from registration). There are an estimated 900,000 charity trustees in England and Wales. Approximately 40 of the 114 respondents to the consultation identified themselves as being trustees.

Of the 114 responses, 53 said the guidance was an improvement on the existing CC3. The Charity Commission has taken the view that the results of its consultation demonstrate that the revised guidance is “overwhelmingly welcomed by the people for whom it is designed – trustees”. It is not entirely clear how a response rate amongst trustees of less than 0.05% corresponds with this view.

Despite the Commission’s upbeat mood, the guidance was not universally liked. Umbrella organisations such as NCVO, the Association of Charitable Foundations and the Charity Finance Group have been critical of the revised guidance stating that it “takes an excessively prescriptive tone in various sections, and misrepresents the scope and nature of the duties that in fact apply to trustees”.

Particular concerns have been raised in relation to the Commission’s approach to the distinction drawn between the “must do’s”, being legal requirements; and the “should do’s”, which are simply standards of good practice.

In the existing guidance, “must” means legal requirements that charities or trustees have to abide by. “Should” means good practice that they should follow unless there is a good reason not to.

In the revised CC3, “should” now means good practice that trustees are expected to follow. Trustees are warned that if they do not follow the stated good practice they may be in breach of their legal duties, and be guilty of misconduct or mismanagement.

In relation to this, the Commission has stated that trustees need to understand “that ‘should’ means ‘really should’ - not ‘maybe, if you feel like it’”.

In addition to this, concerns have been raised as to the negative tone of the revised guidance and the impact that this may have on the numbers willing to become charity trustees.

The final version of the guidance is expected in the summer,

Comment:

The Commission has a very difficult job putting together accurate, concise and readable guidance on matters behind which there are a great many legal principles, cases and pieces of legislation. However, the publication of such guidance is a key element in the delivery of its general functions, as set out in section 15 of the Charities Act 2011.

The Commission has moved away from providing charity trustees with advice and has now positioned itself as the sector’s “policeman” and the revised CC3 is a further indication of the very different regulatory landscape.

The new regulatory powers to be introduced by the Protection of Charities Bill will reinforce the Commission’s position further and it will be interesting to see the effect of this on the numbers of both trustees and charities.

40 responses from charity trustees to the Commission’s next consultation might represent a much better return.

If you would like to discuss any of the points raised in this blog, please do not hesitate to contact Graeme on 0151 600 3079 or graeme.hughes@brabners.com.

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Exporters mustn't underestimate their value to our economy. In fact, they need to do more.

Posted by Andy Snell

Head of International Trade & Commercial Services

Mon 13th, Apr

Every time I drive down Speke Boulevard or the Knowsley Expressway, I see car transporters loaded with Range Rover Evoque and Land Rover Discovery models.

The sight of them embarking on the first leg of a journey from the Halewood factory to destinations all over the world never fails to raise my spirits.

It tells us that this city is connected with global markets and is supplying something that customers want.

Like the UK as a whole, we need more exporters. Why? Because exporting boosts productivity. Not only is there a whole host of academic research to prove* it’s also common sense.

In the face of global competition, businesses can only sell their products around the world if they are as productive and efficient as possible.

And as a country, we desperately need to boost productivity. It won’t be mentioned much during the General Election campaign, but the shocking trend in productivity per head in Britain’s private sector is the most pressing economic problem we face. It has fallen 4 per cent since 2008 compared with a rise of more than 8 per cent in the USA.**

That’s why I welcome the interim report of the Cole Commission on Exports and, in particular, its call for the issue to be at the heart of economic planning.

The commission, headed by Graham Cole, chairman of Agusta Westland UK, was set up by the Labour Party but its findings should be acted upon by whoever forms the next government.

It calls for big ticket projects to be handled by a merged UK Trade & Investment and UK Export Finance, while Chambers of Commerce provide a one-stop shop for SMEs.

Helping exporters is already a key part of our core business and we’re keen to do more. The message to exporters is clear – your country needs you and ought to be doing a lot more to help.

 

* Do exports generate higher productivity? Evidence from Slovenia. Jan De Loecker, Department of Economics, Stern School of Business, New York University.

Does Exporting Increase Productivity? A Microeconometric Analysis of Matched Firms. Sourafel Girma, David Greenaway, and Richard Kneller.

** Thomson Reuters Datastream/Fathom Consulting.

Do you need help to develop your exporting potential? Sign up free of charge to the New Markets and Export Growth programme and receive 12 hour business assist and access to funding.

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Ian McGee outlines the key economic indicators for last week

Posted by Ian Mcgee

Natwest - Relationship Director

Fri 10th, Apr

A respectable 0.6% expansion in output in the final quarter of the year currently places the UK in top spot among advanced nations for 2014 economic performance. Yet poor productivity growth continues to cast doubt about its sustainability. In the US, weak job growth added to concerns that the pace of expansion is slowing.

That was the year that was. A stronger performance than first thought during the last three months of 2014 meant the UK economy grew by a spritely 2.8%y/y last year. That’s one of the fastest rates of growth among the developed nations. Households played their part, spending 2.5% more in 2014 than the year before. They paid mainly through rising salaries but partly by reducing savings. And the UK story is more than just a consumer one as business investment rose by 7.5%.

Spoiler alert. A persistent spoiler is the UK’s current account deficit – our financial position relative to the rest of the world. Almost ever present, our deficit widened to 5.5% of GDP in 2014, the biggest since records began in 1948. The problem isn’t so much poor trade performance. At 2% of GDP our trade deficit is lower than in the years leading up to the crisis. Rather it rests with our foreign investments, or more precisely the low returns we currently earn on them. In contrast, an expanding UK economy means we are generating relatively decent returns for foreign investors who own assets here.

Running out of road. The UK’s strong growth prompted an equally strong pace of job creation. That’s good news for workers, but also extends an enduring puzzle about the UK’s economic recovery; namely the absence of productivity growth. GDP is now 3.4% above its pre-crisis peak but output per hour is still 1.7% below its old level. And rather than recent growth propelling productivity upwards, for the last two years it has slipped sideways. Weak productivity is probably delaying the moment when the Bank of England first raises interest rates. But unless we see a turnaround in our productivity soon, 2014 may prove to be the high watermark for growth.

Resurrection. The UK’s makers continued their encouraging start to the year in March. The Purchasing Managers’ Index of manufactures reached an 8-month high of 54.4 (a reading above 50 signals expansion). It’s the domestic economy that’s driving growth, particularly the consumer goods sector. Prices are continuing to fall too, both the costs to manufacturers and the prices they charge. And there’s better news on exports, with new export orders reaching its highest reading since August. The recent return to life for the Eurozone's economy may just be beginning to support the UK's export sector.

With moderation. With 61,000 new mortgage approvals, February saw the third consecutive monthly increase, adding to the in-tray of conflicting messages on the state of the UK housing market. Last week the Nationwide house price index reported the cost of a typical house rose by 0.1% in March. That’s not much. But then that’s not necessarily a bad thing. Like prices, mortgage approvals and hence housing transactions should continue to increase, albeit moderately.

Two directions. The direction of travel for the Eurozone’s inflation and unemployment rates has been welcome. While the
unemployment rate edged down again in February, to 11.3% (hiding a huge difference between countries mind), deflation eased to just -0.1%y/y in March, up from -0.3% in February. That's similar to the UK inflation rate. The fact that two economies performing so differently have near identical inflation suggests an external force acting on both. Mainly that's weak global price pressures, most famously but not exclusively oil. Exclude energy and Eurozone inflation is 0.6%y/y.

Blip or warning? The US added 126,000 jobs in March, leaving unemployment at 5.5%. That was a sharply-reduced rate of job creation compared with the preceding 12 months when the economy had added almost 270,000 per month. While the usual warning applies – don’t rely too much on a single piece of data – weak job growth adds to surprisingly poor retail sales and industrial production data. The US equivalents of the Purchasing Managers’ Index have also suggested growth is slowing. It’s too soon to sound a warning bell but these data will only encourage the Fed to keep rates low for longer.

Soft landing? US house price inflation slowed to 4.5%y/y in January. A year ago it was running at 10.5%. Prices fell by 0.1% m/m, the fifth consecutive monthly decline. This gentle slowing of price rises is the thing of central bankers’ dreams. And there are signs that house price inflation could be approaching a floor. The proportion of borrowers well behind on their mortgage payments is at its lowest rate since 2008, meaning fewer forced house sales. Applications for mortgages to buy a house – rather than remortgaging – were up 8%y/y last week.

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New connection announced is symbolic of Liverpool's growing aviation hub

Posted by Paul Cherpeau

Chief Executive

Tue 31st, Mar

Today's announcement by Liverpool John Lennon Airport represents a major step forward in achieving global connectivity for Liverpool.

We are delighted that the proactive engagement by JLA with aircraft carriers and local businesses has begun to bear fruit with Flybe. More than 1m passengers from the city region use other airports every year to then connect onwards to travel to European and global destinations. 10% of our airport's current 4m footfall comprises business travel.

This announcement will open up excellent opportunities for business travel to new export markets and some of the most prosperous and attractive economies of the world. Having a hub connection will also improve our attractiveness as a destination for inward investment. The prospects for business travel to and from Liverpool are suddenly much stronger. The impact of a successful international hub connection upon our economy cannot be understated and the Liverpool & Sefton Chambers of Commerce and its members will welcome this new link.

New York, Bangkok, Singapore, Hong Kong, Tokyo, Shanghai and Toronto are all markets that are conveniently reachable from our home airport through this international hub connection.

Our long term aspiration has been to establish a connection to the UK hub at an expanded Heathrow. Capacity issues make that impossible in the short term. The link to the Amsterdam hub represents a tremendous opportunity for our city region's businesses and population to reach destinations previously unreachable or unaffordable. 

The Chamber looks forward to supporting JLA's aspiration to make Flybe’s Amsterdam link a success, to continue the campaign for a link to a UK hub at Heathrow and to grow the airport's market share by building a business case that is attractive to other prospective operators.

Our link to the world just got stronger.

 

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In last week's 60RUM, Ph. Creative gave us some top tips for doing business online. Missed it? See below for his 60 second summary

Posted by Mark Russell

Inbound Marketing Executive at Ph.Creative

  • T: 0151 227 5549
Wed 25th, Mar

As part of the series of events run by the Liverpool Chamber of Commerce for Digi-March, we covered a range of tactics to help make the most of your time online and capture the interest of your target audience.

It’s becoming more and more difficult to capture your audience’s attention as the digital space becomes inundated with brands and businesses promoting their products and services across many of the social media channels. In this post we will summarise what we covered and provide some recommendations on how you can start to win online.

So… what is winning?

Winning is when you become the thought leader and the go-to-person in your industry and the best in your sector on a local, national, or even an international level. However, it takes hard work, a long time, and you need to follow some frameworks to make sure you keep on the right path and don’t lose sight of your defined end goal.

Where to start?

Customer Journey - Framework 1

This framework allows you to understand the journey you want your eventual customers to take. It follows a methodical process that starts with them being strangers and having no knowledge of your business, to becoming a customer who is delighted and willing to spread positive word-of-mouth recommendations to their networks.

Content Journey - Framework 2

This framework allows you to understand the content you need to create in order to take your “stranger” to a “delighted” customer. To be able to use this framework effectively you’ll have to have an understanding of who it is you’ll be targeting and what content they’ll be interested in reading (blogs) and viewing (visuals/videos).

To find out more about persona mapping workshops and how to find out your WHY, take a look the slides here http://www.slideshare.net/MarkRussell11/liverpool-chamber-of-commerce-presentation-200315-1

So… what is a persona?                 

A persona is semi-fictional character that you create based on your ideal target audience. You can have as many personas as you want, however to keep your marketing efforts streamlined and effective, it’s ideal to create a persona for each of your products. If you have many then choose your best selling products or the customers who generate the most profit.

Below is a picture of a persona workshop that we undertake when starting a digital strategy at Ph.Creative. This enables us to start to create a customer content journey (a combination of Framework 1 and 2).

Winning with influencers

After you've created your personas and understand their journey to becoming your customers, you’ve got to think about who will be influencing their decision making process. An easy way to categorise and organise your influencer marketing is by understanding them as follows:

Influential influencers: Big media publications and final decision makers

Collective influencers: Groups, institutes and communities

Brand influencers: Bloggers and journalists

Local influencers: Those working in similar businesses and in your industry

What about content?

Content marketing is all the rage in today’s noisy online world. We explained the importance of creating purposeful content and being able to match the content you create to the different parts of the frameworks which in turn creates a timeline you can implement. Below is an example of a timeline we created for a client, this shows the use of See, Think, Do, Delight types of activities over a period of time.

                                    Customer Content Journey - Example

Last but certainly not least… social media

The final part of the jigsaw is being able to make sure you use social media as a tool to listen to your audience, start conversations and ultimately sell. We explained some tools that you can use along the way to make sure your social media efforts are streamlined and maximise your time online.

Some of the networks we covered were:

Facebook Advertising: Perfect for promoting your content

Pinterest: Ideal for retail, fashion, education, and food businesses

LinkedIn Groups: Great to build authority in a certain niche

Twitter Lists: A tactic you can use for social listening

Final thoughts… be more like Charlie Sheen

Check out upcoming 60 Really Useful Minutes here

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Late payments threaten business growth, especially for SMEs.

Posted by Jenny Stewart

Chief Executive of Liverpool & Sefton Chambers of Commerce

Tue 24th, Mar

We all want to see less red tape, not more. And we’d prefer to see business disputes resolved by dialogue rather than litigation.

But all the talk in the world can’t protect small businesses from late payment and other forms of ill-treatment by big companies and public sector organisations.

Late payment is a cultural problem. It causes cash flow problems, imposes unnecessary interest charges on suppliers and it’s hard to see how to stop it.

In 2012, The British Chambers of Commerce commissioned a survey of more than 5,000 businesses. Of those, 94 per cent had been paid late and 24 per cent said that nearly half of all their invoices were settled later than had been agreed.

A third of respondents said their worst late payers were larger businesses with more than 50 employees.

Two-thirds said private sector firms were worse than public sector organisations and only a third said the opposite. The latter finding came as a surprise at the time, given that the government had given a commitment to settle undisputed invoices within 10 days.

Several big companies have recently imposed, or attempted to impose, lengthier payment terms. And this is not the only kind of abuse suppliers face: Tesco’s recent problems exposed the scale of the rebates it demands from suppliers; and Premier Foods has come in for criticism for levying millions of pounds in charges on companies that want to remain on its supplier list.

Although George Osborne didn’t mention it in his speech on Wednesday, the Budget contained a promise to extend the Prompt Payment Code, which is administered by the Institute of Credit Management on behalf of the business department.

Currently, the code has only 1,824 signatories and in February there was far from universal backing from its own supporters for plans to strengthen its terms by insisting on a 60-day maximum payment term with 30-day payment as the norm. A survey found that only 57 per cent of respondents believed the changes to be workable.

There are some glimmers of hope. Diageo recently abandoned plans to extend its payment terms for suppliers to 90 days for fear of being delisted as a signatory to the code.

And the Chancellor also promised last week that all central government departments will have to make quarterly reports about their payment records starting from next month.

Perhaps more information, and public naming and shaming of companies which ill-treat their suppliers, is the best hope for challenging the culture of late payment.

Have you experienced late payments? Contact the policy team at policy@liverpoolchamber.org.uk

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A much awaited overhaul of rail infrastructure has been announced. It's now up to us to articulate our message to Government and city leaders.

Posted by Paul Cherpeau

Chief Executive

Fri 20th, Mar

Today’s announcement from the DfT of a Northern Transport Strategy which proposes a radical overhaul of northern transport infrastructure is to be welcomed as a long-awaited step in the right direction albeit one that must not remain at conceptual stage.

It has long been our concern that Liverpool’s apparent exclusion from the proposed high speed rail map was a massive opportunity missed.

It is encouraging that these proposals now talk of a Northern Powerhouse that extends from Liverpool in the West to Hull and Newcastle in the East.

The Chancellor’s rhetoric during the budget was very much focussed on the Manchester and Leeds conurbations. Both cities have become the focus upon which the Northern Powerhouse is articulated by the coalition government; the Northern Transport Strategy outlined in today’s report suggests that Liverpool has the opportunity to become part of the solution.

Whilst investment in infrastructure may be more concentrated in improvements to the Leeds-Manchester road and rail network, we should not consider that a snub to Liverpool. The big bottleneck in our transpennine connection is in that area and if we as businesses want to get across the country by car or train, that is where the current link needs fixing.

fact that a high speed link between Liverpool and Manchester is explicitly highlighted as a potential development would go some way towards mitigating the wider connectivity of Liverpool to the wider UK rail network.

Our port city status should be critical to the UK’s strategy for the North and a faster and more robust connection to the Eastern ports would help increase the UK’s competitiveness in the maritime sector as well as boosting the inter-city business (and consumer) travel across the Pennines.

It is perhaps symbolic that today’s announcement was made by the Transport Secretary and business leaders in the North at the Liverpool 2 Container terminal. We’re finally back on the map.

Strategies are strategies are strategies. We’re very good at writing them, sometimes less good at implementing them.

If this is to be truly transformative for the North – and particularly for Liverpool – we must see these plans gain traction and not be allowed to gather dust.

Momentum is key to these schemes and sometimes difficult to maintain given their long-term timescale of delivery. As a city region we must now articulate our message, policy and voice with a mature, credible and overall positive dialogue with government and our fellow Northern cities.

 

Feed into the debate by joining our Transport Committee

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Darren Grimes outlines the key tax changes in Budget 2015

Posted by Darren Grimes

Tax Director

  • T: 0151 243 1200
Thu 19th, Mar

George Osborne presented his pre-election Budget speech today and there were largely no surprises.

There was expected to be a Conservative “giveaway” to charm the voters at the election, and despite the Chancellor emphasising that the benefits of increased growth, high employment and deficit reductions would not be squandered on tax cuts, he did announce increases to both the personal allowance and the higher rate threshold for income tax purposes. Over the next two years, the personal allowance will increase from £10,600 to £11,000 with in an increase in the higher rate threshold from £42,385 to £43,300. Therefore, not only will those on lower incomes benefit, but the “squeezed middle” will not miss out either.

For businesses, it was disappointing that the Chancellor didn’t announce any increase to the Annual Investment Allowance (currently due to fall to £25,000 from 1 January next year), however he did say that this would be covered in the Autumn Statement. More generally for companies, corporation tax rates will fall to 20% from 1 April 2015, which is one of the lowest rates amongst the top 10 world economies.

One of the more interesting announcements related to the “abolition of tax returns” from 2020. What this appears to mean in practice is that new “digital tax accounts” will be created for those currently completing self assessment returns. It is expected that businesses’ accounting systems and, more crucially, banking systems will be linked directly to HM Revenue and Customs online to provide “real-time” tax information, thus abolishing the need for tax returns. It will interesting to see how this works in practice, particularly for those with more complex tax affairs, not to mention the security concerns over linking accounting/banking records directly to HMRC.

There were also some specific announcements around tax anti-avoidance with new penalties being introduced for evaders and avoiders and their advisers. In total, anti-avoidance and evasion measures are expected to raise £3.1 billion.

Throw in reductions in tax for the oil industry, incentives for the creative industries and in increase in the bank levy – and you have the 2015 Budget. 

If you'd like help with your tax planning, contact DSG Accountants

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Minimum wage for apprenticeships increase may bridge the gap but must not deter employers

Posted by Paul Cherpeau

Chief Executive

Thu 19th, Mar

Yesterday's budget (or party political broadcast for the Conservative Party) confirmed the government’s announcement on Tuesday that not only would the national minimum wage be increasing, but the Apprenticeship minimum wage would also increase by a rate far above that recommended by the independent Pay Commission.

Despite the obvious clamour for votes, I don’t think there will be too many people upset about the announcement of an increase in the minimum wage although clearly the 3% rise must be just the start of a long term plan to ensure work pays for the citizens of our country.

The increase in the apprenticeship minimum wage is a classic double-edged sword.

Apprenticeships are becoming increasingly popular in the current climate of high university tuition fees, yet there remains an underlying stigmatism for many young people that an apprenticeship is the ‘diet coke’ of going to university, getting a degree and having a damn good time whilst there. The pay discrepancy for apprentices entering the workplace at 16 potentially perpetuates this stigmatism so the increase is to be applauded if (and it’s a big ‘if’) this stigma is further eroded.

Yet recruitment into any organisation at any level is arguably the single biggest risk to a business. Get the wrong person and a substantial investment in time, resource and reputation can be wasted. Committing to employing, training and developing a young person, particularly at 16 or 17 years of age, is a big commitment for a smaller business that is partially mitigated by incentives, such as the low starting wage. A greater focus on encouraging firms to invest in training and supporting young people as they begin their careers is how we will improve the skills of young people and prepare them for fulfilling and well-paid careers. The substantial increase in the apprentice minimum wage could act as a disincentive for employers considering taking on an apprentice for the first time.

That being said, it’s a positive step that the value of apprentices is being recognised. It is my hope that the change in the apprenticeship minimum wage from October will create a culture of quality over quantity, with those employers who are serious about providing a genuine opportunity for young people being rewarded over those who are looking simply for cheap labour. It may also create a culture of competitiveness for these quality apprenticeships, addressing issues of doing an apprenticeship ‘for the sake of it’ and ensuring that the financial reward makes it an attractive proposition. 

At the Chamber, we employ ten apprentices in the workplace and have implemented a wage progression plan that ensures our apprentices receive more than the basic minimum and will ultimately progress onto the living wage. We feel this is an important commitment that we are working towards that provides our apprentices with an end goal that we believe will motivate and inspire them to work hard, perform well and make a positive contribution to our organisation.

Let us hope that the new apprenticeship minimum wage can have a similarly positive effect.

Interested in taking on an apprenticeship? Contact the recruitment team at Liverpool Chamber Training

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