Posted by Paul Cherpeau

Chief Executive

Fri 15th, Jun

This week I was invited to speak to and present primary school pupils with certificates for completing their Children’s University passport. The 'Passport to Learning Scheme' rewards after-school club participation and is designed to help prepare youngsters for secondary school and the opportunities beyond.

Listening to the children talk about their passion for sports, drama, dance, music – and one young man’s assertion that he “works hard, plays hard” (aged 11!) – it demonstrated how the excellence of our primary schools can inspire so many opportunities to create our next generation of working citizens with the skills and talent that we want and need within our society.

Our curriculum at secondary school has become increasingly focussed upon the traditional academic subjects and a ‘results at all costs’ mentality which has permeated education for the past 20 years. Yet we see an ever-increasing challenge of mental health and wellbeing in young people, at least partially stimulated by an inability to adapt to such a dogmatic system that fails to adequately reward or recognise talent in some of the more creative or technical subjects. We have some outstanding secondary schools in our city region but the pressures applied to them frequently result in students’ personal development and employability talent to be subjugated in the pursuit of exam results.

Careers advice and guidance is fragmented and disjointed, lacking resources to genuinely enable all school pupils to be prepared for, and guided into, the available opportunities. The ONS data released this week for 2017 demonstrated that 11.3% of our City Region population (108,000 people) had no qualifications against a rate of 7.7% in Great Britain. Our unemployment rate was 4.9% against a 4.4% Great Britain rate. It’s not good enough and needs adequate resources, funding and coordination for schools to tackle the problem.

On 20th July, we will deliver our latest economic business breakfast and will welcome representatives from the Department for Education and the Institute for Apprenticeships to enable the voice of business to be articulated and engaged about the impending changes and reforms to vocational and technical education and apprenticeships. 

For those businesses who seek to recruit or train people through apprenticeships, it is essential that you engage with this session and provide the ‘on the ground’ evidence and experience. The introduction of T-Levels, the development of further apprenticeship standards and continued deployment of the Apprenticeship Levy are all issues that our businesses will be experiencing every day and we want Chamber member businesses to fully engage with our guests at the breakfast to bridge the gap between policy-making and reality.

The apprenticeship system is a very real and tangible output from the school system. Both have their flaws and it is imperative that our businesses can influence our policy makers with insight, experience and credibility.

Children’s University provided a snapshot of some young people with dreams, ambitions and excitement for the future. We cannot allow our education system to fail them and as businesses, must contribute our resources to ensure that our requirements are met in the development of future talent at school and within our apprenticeship and technical education system.

* Children’s University is a national scheme operated in Sefton Borough Council by Sefton EBP with graduation ceremonies taking place at Edge Hill University.

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Chris Witterick, Head of Operations at LAB by Capacity

Posted by Liverpool and Sefton Chambers of Commerce

Fri 15th, Jun

Introduce yourself – name, where do you sit in the business, and what does the business do?

Chris Witterick, Head of Operations at LAB by Capacity – An innovative Co-working space and business incubator for commercial start-ups and social businesses.

What changes would you like to see to improve or develop your sector?

More opportunities for social businesses to deliver public services. They already work in the community, employ local people and deliver real social value.

What does a typical working day look like?

Usually an early start, overseeing the team at LAB and making sure we are delivering quality and value for our members. I’m not a fan of sitting at a desk, so always try and get out and about as much as possible.

What advice would you give your teenage self?

Go to university! I pursued a professional golf career for around 10 years, which was great, BUT I regret not going to university.

Where would we find you on your day off?

Hesketh Golf Club – Although I have a 14 month old boy who is seriously getting in the way of my golf…

What is the best advice you have been given in your career?

You can get anything you want in life, if you just help enough other people get what they want.

Who is your role model in business?

Probably my dad. He left a secure job 25 years ago, reinvented himself and set up a business from zero. The business went on to be the industry leader in the UK and Europe.

Why choose Liverpool City Region?

I’ve lived and worked around the world, and always looked forward to coming back to Liverpool. There is a real desire to make the city a success, and you get the feeling that most people are happy to work together to build something great.

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Gregory Kearns, Sales & Marketing Assitant at The Brain Charity

Posted by Liverpool and Sefton Chambers of Commerce

Fri 08th, Jun

Introduce yourself - name, where do you sit in the business, and what does the business do?

I'm Gregory Kearns from The Brain Charity. We are an organisation that helps people affected by neurological conditions in a variety of different ways including community activities, advice and practical support. Our centre doubles up as a room hire venue as well as having our Brain Food Café. I’m a Sales and Marketing assistant which means dealing with mainly room hire but I’ve jumped into all sorts of roles in the organisation when required. 

What changes would you like to see to improve or develop your sector?

At the moment the Third Sector seems isolated; people donate but aren’t always connected to the outcome of that money or necessarily have an understanding of what the charity actually does. I think if we could change the culture and bring the Third Sector closer to the education sector then we would have a future generation who would have a better awareness and understanding of all sorts of issues.

What does a typical working day look like?

For smaller charities like The Brain Charity typical work days don’t exist. I could be producing material for our social media to give to our Comms Team, going out with our Community Ambassadors engaging with the public or taking people around our centre, showing off our wonderful rooms.

What advice would you give your teenage self?

I don’t feel wise enough to be giving anyone advice, but I wish I could have just been less anxious. However telling someone to be less anxious is rarely helpful – or successful.

Where would we find you on your day off?

Don't try and find me - my sleeping face isn't pretty and it is best for all concerned that it remains hidden.

What is the best advice you have been given in your career?

Learn from your mistakes - recognise your achievements.

Why choose Liverpool City Region?

Throughout my childhood my grandparents were constantly working with the charitable sector. Every time we went around for Sunday dinner they would have so many interesting people there who they knew through the charity, but who ended being part of our extended family. I had worked briefly with The Brain Charity when I was at university, so when I emerged fresh-faced, I instinctively knew that that was where I wanted to work and start living the values my grandparents instilled in me – though I like to think that these values were innate in me.

The Brain Charity’s 25th Birthday is coming up - the party is on the 5th of July and I know a guy who can sort you some tickets! 

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Posted by Neil Ashbridge

Fri 01st, Jun

As the weather heats up so, I suspect, are tensions in households across the country, as we enter exam season. It seems timely therefore to reflect on the challenges which employers face on one hand, in finding suitably skilled staff, and on the other, the economic and social impact of not addressing the barriers which often prevent young people reaching their potential.

In the Chamber we have a long history of working with our local universities and colleges, in partnership with private sector businesses, providing work experience, mentoring and intern opportunities. I am delighted that our latest project is with Liverpool Hope Business School which aims to address some of the issues that businesses face in finding skills and the barriers many of our young face in achieving their full potential.  The project will bring business and students together through a range of initiatives such as placements, mentoring and networking events, while also facilitating a number of economic and business research projects.

With some notable exceptions however, there tends to be a less formal engagement process with the education sector more generally, and I believe we are missing a real opportunity to engage with young people at an early age to support their aspirations and give them the confidence and skills to develop their future career path.

The growth of our burgeoning technology sector in the city region is a pertinent example. With experts forecasting increased overseas investment from the US, Europe and Asia, we need to develop the right skills base to support sustained growth in the city region. Our local universities and colleges provide a source of highly talented graduates but could the private sector be doing more to grow talent from the city region itself through raising awareness and inspiring all students at an early age to consider the sector as a future career path? Engaging at an early stage would also help to create a more diverse talent pool and address issues around the gender pay gap. Providing local apprenticeships and supporting young people who want to set up their own business (through mentoring for example) are all ways in which we can start to expand and future proof our skills base.

There are already some excellent initiatives where businesses are working with the local education sector to inspire young people but we need to see more.

We need the capacity to deliver high quality and consistent employment preparation experience for our young people which we can only deliver in partnership and with a realistic level of resources.

The Government recently announced details of a pilot project with over 40 business advisers signed up to provide hands-on bespoke business support to schools to reduce running costs and maximise resources and budgets. The intention is that this will free up teachers to focus, quite rightly, on teaching. Advice will cover aspects of financial management including smarter ways to buy essential services like water or electricity for example, or innovative ways of timetabling classes to free up teachers time.

Admirable as this initiative is, could we not consider taking it a step further so that students can also benefit from this expertise which covers a range a skills relating to financial health and efficiency, not traditionally a core part of the curriculum, but essential for increasing employability and ultimately growing our economy, whether starting up a new business or working for a multinational company.

Other government policies have had a less positive impact, despite good intentions from successive governments, primarily because they have been vulnerable to, and undermined by, the swinging of the political pendulum. To achieve a truly successful programme of education for our next generation, policies must insulate our practitioners, students and businesses from upheaval every few years. The implementation of the apprenticeship levy has demonstrated the difficulties faced by learners and employers in changes to both the funding and the practicalities of the scheme.

We will be looking at the skills agenda (always a priority for our members) at the next Quarterly Economic Survey (QES) Breakfast Briefing on Friday 20 July which will give participants the opportunity to directly input their experiences to those who are tasked with making education work for business. Whilst the views of our FTSE listed companies are important, we also need to ensure that SMEs (which make up 98% of our business base) have a voice to influence the development of any future skills policy. The panel will listen to the practical impact that apprenticeship reform has had on business and discuss how policy will evolve in the coming years.

If you haven't completed the QES Survey yet you have until 11 June click here so you don't miss the opportunity to have your voice heard.

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Posted by Liverpool and Sefton Chambers of Commerce

Tue 29th, May

The Chamber Transport Forum met on Friday 18 May, kindly hosted by Mott McDonald at their offices in the Liver Buildings. One of the aims of the Forum is to provide a wider social and economic context to the transport agenda and we were delighted to welcome Simon Rawlinson, Partner and Head of Strategic Research and Insight at Arcadis, who gave an excellent presentation on the recently published Arcadis report, Investing in Britain. The report looks at issues which impact on the wider investability challenge, recognising the UK’s growth potential and identifying key levers for enhancing growth. Simon gave a fascinating insight on the findings of the report specifically tailored to the city region.
 
Richard Perry, Area Lead for the Department for Transport, picked up on the wider economic theme as part of his update on government policy, outlining the department’s key priorities which include the recognition of the importance to the economy of local and regional transport as well as transformational schemes like Heathrow expansion and HS2. Robin Tudor from Liverpool John Lennon Airport rounded off the session with a short presentation on the Airport’s longer term proposals for growth (Our Journey to 2030) which sets out the potential for how it can further enhance its economic and social impact across the region. We were also delighted to be joined by local MP Louise Ellman, who continues to be a champion for transport policy. Louise gave her usual insider insight as well as taking questions from the Forum.
 
If you would like more information on the Transport Forum please contact policy@liverpoolchamber.org.uk

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Julie Sankey, International Trade Executive at the Chamber

Posted by Liverpool and Sefton Chambers of Commerce

Thu 24th, May

Introduce yourself – name, where do you sit in the business, and what does the business do?

Julie Sankey. I have been with the Chamber since January 2014 working in various aspects of International Trade. I am currently the lead for the New Markets 2 funding programme which provides financial support for companies who are exporting, including costs of flights, accommodation and exhibiting at international trade shows. If you think you might be eligible you can find out more information here.

What changes would you like to see to improve or develop your sector?

Whilst there is support for new and start-up businesses at both a national and regional level, many businesses struggle with the paperwork – so any reduction in red tape and bureaucracy would be a real bonus!  

What does a typical working day look like?

Each day comes with a new set of priorities. In supporting a small business to apply for funding through the New Markets 2 programme, I need to understand what their business objectives are as well as ensuring they understand the eligibility criteria and what the funding covers. They often require wider support and information on exporting more generally and I will refer them to colleagues in the Department for International Trade. I am always looking for opportunities to promote the programme to make sure as many businesses benefit before it comes to an end in September 2018. I get a real sense of personal satisfaction being in a position to provide support for small businesses, helping them to grow through developing new markets.  

What advice would you give your teenage self?

Don’t put off until tomorrow what you can do today! Be decisive in pursuing what you want from life, but don’t be afraid to change direction either.

Where would we find you on your day off?

Ideally walking up a hill in the Lake District.

Last weekend I ran the Rock ‘n Roll Half Marathon in Liverpool. My chosen charity was Genie in the Gutter who support people from all walks of life who suffer from substance misuse and mental health issues.

Who is your role model in business?

Anyone who has the drive, confidence, determination and tenacity to start up their own business and succeed.

Why choose Liverpool City Region?

Liverpool has its own clear identity and culture which make the people great to work with. It has a wealth of history and has easy access to gorgeous countryside in North Wales, the Peak & Lake Districts.

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Posted by Paul Cherpeau

Chief Executive

Thu 17th, May

This week is Mental Health Awareness Week (14 to 20 May) which this year is focussing on stress. Many businesses across the city region already have programmes in place, recognising that mental health and wellbeing is a core business asset but collectively are we doing enough?  

According to the Mental Health Foundation, over the past year almost three quarters (74%) of people have at some point felt so stressed that they felt overwhelmed or unable to cope. With two thirds of us likely to experience a mental health problem and stress a key factor (often leading to depression, anxiety, self-harm and suicide), employers have an increasingly important role to play in recognising the symptoms and developing internal policies which look at prevention as well as support.

Stress can also manifest itself in other ways, for example 46% of those surveyed reported that they ate too much or ate unhealthily due to stress; 29% reported that they started drinking or increased their drinking, and 16% reported that they started smoking or increased their smoking.

Whilst awareness is growing there is still more that we can all do, not just as responsible employers, but also because it makes good business sense with the value added to the economy by people who are at work and have or have had mental health problems estimated to be as high as £225 billion per year, representing 12.1% of the UK's total GDP. There is also strong evidence that workplaces with high levels of mental wellbeing are more productive, increasing productivity by as much as 12%.

There is a range of support available for both employers and employees, including some innovative initiatives developed by our members. For example, Mashbo, who worked in partnership with Chasing the Stigma, a mental health charity, to launch The Hub of Hope in July 2017. This is the first of its kind, national mental health database which brings together organisations and charities, large and small, from across the country who offer mental health advice and support, together in one place. Just six months after its launch the web-based app received over 10,000 unique visits from 751 different cities and towns across 59 countries

Looking forward we are delighted to be working with our strategic partners Merseycare, to develop a joint programme of mental health and wellbeing support for employers over the next six months.

The Hub of Hope’s key message is that there is always somebody to talk to, so let’s use the opportunities provided by Mental Health Awareness Week to start those conversations that really matter to us all - as an employer, a family member, a friend or a work colleague.

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Karen Caffrey, Managing Director of Home Carers Liverpool

Posted by Liverpool and Sefton Chambers of Commerce

Thu 17th, May

Introduce yourself – name, where do you sit in the business, and what does the business do

Karen Caffrey Managing Director of Home Carers Liverpool (HCL) and Chairperson of Liverpool Home Care Providers CIC actively promoting the sector. HCL are a lead domiciliary care provider in Liverpool established in 1994 and currently delivering domiciliary care services to older people in their own homes. We recruit all our staff locally supporting the neighbourhood model of care delivery. As a former Practice nurse, I am passionate about promoting health and wellbeing across our workforce and the people we care for to support healthier lifestyles and reduce the strain on the NHS.

We work collaboratively with a range of providers from public, private and voluntary sector in order to deliver holistic care services to our service users and support the local economy.

What changes would you like to see to improve or develop your sector?

Recruitment and retention is a big problem in social care and there are lots of measures that I think would help - probably too many to list here! For example, we fully support the apprenticeship programme, working with a range of schools and colleges and in the past eight years we have trained over 270 apprentices. I would love to see more political support at a local level for funded apprenticeships for young people in social care.

I would welcome a joint initiative with the health sector to support recruitment to create more parity between the sectors as we are often seen as a stepping stone to a career in the health sector which means we lose a lot of the talent we nurture. We need to raise the profile of social care and the opportunities it can provide across a range of skills.

I would also like to see closer working with primary care providers to reduce the number of hospital admissions and delayed discharges. This could include, for example, shared access to training to upskill the workforce in preventative measures.

What does a typical working day look like?

No two days are the same in social care as it moves at a fast pace and that’s what makes a great place to work! Typically I have daily meetings with my senior management team where we will review targets, address any complaints and celebrate any positive feedback. I have a great team and we work with a range of partners to support staff particularly through health and wellbeing initiatives. It was so rewarding for all the team to have our work recognised when we won the Chamber's Responsible Business Award in 2017. I also seem to spend a lot of time writing tenders!

What advice would you give your teenage self

Study while you are young before you start a family - I established my business with four children!

Don’t worry if you make the wrong career choice. I started out a nurse, ended up in social care and established my business as a result.

Where would we find you on your day off?

In the gym or Anglesey - my favourite place to unwind

What is the best advice you have been given in your career?

Focus on quality, aim high and network.

Who is your role model in business

Maggie O’Carroll at the Women’s Organisation is inspirational, supporting women across business. Maggie has been instrumental in giving me the confidence to aim higher and to develop our business model to help us to go to the next level. I also want to mention Rosemary Kay of the eHealth cluster who has supported me to develop the links with the digital providers in the city and across Europe, helping us raise the profile of SME’s in social care and putting Liverpool on the map.

Why choose Liverpool City Region?

I was born in Liverpool and I love the city and the people and LFC of course! We are now expanding our business across the Liverpool city region and I am delighted to be working with Sefton and Knowsley to share our experience of delivering preventative services in Liverpool. I am excited about the new procurement models of working and look forward to working more closely with our health colleagues across the region.

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Andy MacGregor, Managing Director of BT Local Business

Posted by Liverpool and Sefton Chambers of Commerce

Fri 11th, May

Introduce yourself – name, where do you sit in the business, and what does the business do?

Hi, my name is Andy MacGregor and I have been running the BT Local Business for Liverpool Chester and North Wales for over 15 years now, our business and employees purely works for BT and is responsible for sales to businesses with less than 100 Employees. We have a team of 35 people with various roles in the company – Business Development Managers calling customers re upgrades at the exchanges, Account Managers for the larger accounts, Field Specialists and a Support Team that interface with the bigger BT.

What changes would you like to see to improve or develop your sector?

With the need for a reliable internet connection becoming more and more important every day, I am very enthusiastic about the moves being made towards the integration of 4G technology and traditional internet access. For SME’s this really helps provide resilience and can assist in far reaching places. My view would be that it would be great to see more internet connectivity using 4G technology as a back-up and therefore less risk of loss of service to businesses.

What does a typical working day look like?

Breakfast with my family, Office for 8.30, Generally I have 1 or 2 appointments in a day as well, and then back to the office, leave at 6.30 on a good day and home for tea.

What advice would you give your teenage self?

Embrace technology and look at the future, don’t do what others are doing, look at emerging technology and look to start a company in what is not yet happening. Some people may use the term “ride the wave”, however now a days I think being in business with changing technology is already like a series of technological waves, so I think it’s better to “create the wave”.

Where would we find you on your day off?

I have to juggle my love of cycling and golf with family pursuits..!

What is the best advice you have been given in your career?

I think the best advice was “you are only as good as your team” and looking at the highs and lows of my career that is definitely the case, great people equal great results and when you have them that makes work so much easier.

Who is your role model in business?

This is hard, I love different people at different times, I have found that most of my best inspiration has come at training events and just reading blogs.

Why choose Liverpool City Region?

If I am honest Liverpool folks may term myself as a southern softy having come from the West Country and then London, however I met my wife and moved up here 18 years ago and I am pleased to say that I would never leave the area. I think Liverpool and the north west are amazing, with the Lakes up the road and North Wales a short trip away we are blessed to live and work where we do.

 

BT Local Business is hosting our next Meet & Eat on Tuesday 22nd May at Malmaison. Click here to book your place and learn about the 'Future of Business'.

 

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Posted by Paul Cherpeau

Chief Executive

Thu 10th, May

Earlier this week, the Chamber hosted an event with Heathrow Airport to discuss the opportunities for improved UK connectivity as part of the consultation on the Government’s Airport National Policy Statement (NPS) which sets out the need for additional airport capacity in the south-east of England.

With the parliamentary vote on NPS expected in the summer, we heard from some excellent speakers from a range of sectors, all making the compelling case for the need to increase capacity for more domestic flights between London and the rest of the UK.

The clear message from Flybe, Continental Airlines and local airport operators including Liverpool John Lennon Airport was that there are two key issues we need to address to support the commercial case for increased domestic flights. They are the need to address the issue of domestic air passenger duty (APD) which is making UK airports uncompetitive and the need to increase capacity at Heathrow. All were clear that the longer we prevaricate the more likely it is that we will lose out to our global competitors.

To open up new export markets and opportunities for inward investment, particularly post Brexit, we have long argued that we must improve our existing transport infrastructure and improved access to our ports and airports to transport both people and freight is fundamental to that aim.

For the Liverpool city region we have both the opportunity to grow the leisure, tourism and retail sectors as well as promoting our expertise in areas like the creative and digital sectors. As we aspire to attract more global brands to invest in the region however, we need to be able to compete on a level playing field and be more ambitious about what we can achieve.

Supporting the Heathrow proposals is an important piece of the jigsaw and provides a timely opportunity to demonstrate how we can work in partnership at both a political and commercial level to make the case for improved global and domestic connectivity. It is simplistic to pigeon hole the Heathrow development as an investment for ‘the South’ at the expense of the North. Connectivity with the UK’s hub airport immediately enhances our ability to attract even more outstanding international conferences and visitors to the city and would boost our attractiveness to investors in campaigns such as the current bid for Channel 4.

So whilst the Heathrow link is a jigsaw piece, at the same time, we need to continue to look at the whole end to end journey experience, making the business case for improved road and rail links, if we are to achieve real parity in the domestic and global markets and position Liverpool City Region as the best place to start, locate or operate a business in the UK.

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5 minutes with...

Fri 15th, Jun

Chris Witterick, Head of Operations at LAB by Capacity

5 minutes with...

Fri 08th, Jun

Gregory Kearns, Sales & Marketing Assitant at The Brain Charity

5 minutes with...

Thu 24th, May

Julie Sankey, International Trade Executive at the Chamber

5 minutes with...

Thu 17th, May

Karen Caffrey, Managing Director of Home Carers Liverpool

5 minutes with...

Fri 11th, May

Andy MacGregor, Managing Director of BT Local Business

Bringing Britain Closer

Thu 10th, May