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Paul Cherpeau, Chief Executive of Liverpool Chamber reacts to UNESCO decision to strip Liverpool of its World Heritage Status

“In this wider context, the loss of World Heritage Status is a glancing blow, yet Liverpool remains steady in its pursuit of economic prosperity for the people who live and work here through the creation of jobs and opportunities to broaden our economic base”

Paul Cherpeau – Chief Executive – Liverpool Chamber

Paul Cherpeau, Chief Executive said:

“It would, of course, be better for Liverpool to retain World Heritage Status, but not at the expense of developing our city for the benefit of future generations.

“Liverpool has wonderful heritage assets and huge potential for growth; those two opportunities can co-exist in harmony and we must not try to play one off against the other. It’s a shame, therefore, that Unesco has taken this decision without further investigation.

“In this wider context, the loss of World Heritage Status is a glancing blow, yet Liverpool remains steady in its pursuit of economic prosperity for the people who live and work here through the creation of jobs and opportunities to broaden our economic base.”

Business leaders react to the news

Paul Kallee-Grover, chair of Liverpool China Partnership, said:

“The stripping of World Heritage City status is disappointing, but Liverpool remains a city that has proudly blended heritage and modernity for centuries. What were once considered modern are now key heritage assets. Our sister city Shanghai is a fantastic example of a city that has managed to create a very successful and innovative blend of the modern side by side with heritage – there is no reason why Liverpool will not do this with the Liverpool Waters and Everton Stadium schemes.

“Our waterfront is a key driver for the city region’s economy and it will continue to be so. We should also not forget that we are still a UNESCO City of Music that draws millions of visitors from all around the world each year, whose love for our city is unwavering.”

Sean Keyes, managing director at civil & structural engineering firm, Sutcliffe – multi-disciplinary, BIM-accredited chartered consultants, with offices in Liverpool, Manchester, North Wales and London:

“UNESCO has made a mistake. You only have to look at Royal Albert Dock and The Three Graces, which are truly world class examples of heritage sites that have been modernised. Liverpool has an impressive track record of doing this sort of thing.

“Bramley-Moore Dock has been derelict all my life here in Liverpool and most people have never seen or even heard of it. Why anyone would not want to see this area redeveloped and the jobs it would create is beyond me. While having UNESCO World Heritage Site status was undoubtedly a badge for the city to wear proudly, if it is going to stifle our growth then it is not worth having.”

Kevin Tully, managing director of Tulway Engineering, said:

“As an Evertonian and business owner in Liverpool, I welcome the new developments on the waterfront, the positive impact that they will have for the City Region and the job opportunities that they will create.

“The current site is a derelict dock and after attending many meetings about the proposed plans for that area, I am certain that the investment and positive impact that will come from regenerating these empty spaces will far outweigh the loss of the World Heritage Site status.

“Liverpool is a brilliant, vibrant city with a beautiful waterfront that is only going to get better, and being stripped of its World Heritage Site status is not going to deter visitors who want to absorb the culture and history of our city. I’m not disheartened by this news, but very optimistic for a more improved Liverpool.”

Tulway is a national fabrication and engineering group, supporting companies with fabrication, mechanical installation, and site maintenance services for almost 25 years. Blue chip clients include National Grid and Stellantis.