Ahead of our flagship event at the International Festival of Business 2016, Meet Your Global Business Network, we look at the opportunities for British firms in Singapore

Posted by Andy Snell

Head of International Trade & Commercial Services

Fri 15th, Apr

Sitting centrally in South East Asia, Singapore is ideally located for British businesses looking to access one of the most exciting and profitable regions in the global economy.

Recognised by the World Bank as the easiest place to open, run and conduct business and located on historically commercial maritime and aviation routes, Singapore is globally renowned as a key logistical hub that sits at the heart of international trade.

British firms looking to engage with the Singaporean market and capitalise on recent growth in the wider region are attracted to Singapore for the fact it can serve as a gateway to other nations not only in South East Asia, but the whole Asian continent. With strong IP protection, a highly skilled and educated population and 50% of the world’s population within a 6 hour flight, Singapore is a market with tremendous opportunity.

Whilst all industries and sectors are of interest, there are more prospects for UK businesses in the following areas;

  • Aerospace
  • Advanced Manufacturing & Engineering
  • Clean Energy
  • Financial & Professional Services
  • Smart Technologies

Interested in discovering more? ‘Meet Your Global Business Network’ will return as part of IFB2016 on Thursday 16th June. You’ll have the chance to participate in a 1-2-1 meeting with Brigitte Holtschneider, Executive Director of the British Chamber of Commerce, Singapore.

Brigitte will be one of many regional specialists joining us on the day, over 30+ international markets have currently confirmed including: Latin America, South East Asia/Asia-Pacific, Africa, Europe, and the Middle East.

With a wealth of knowledge and experience, these regional specialists are key to providing the specific advice and support needed to turn exporting ambitions into trading realities.

On the day, keynote speakers will set the scene on emerging markets for global businesses, you can attend breakout panel sessions with specific markets and we’ll facilitate 1-2-1 meetings on your behalf, ensuring you to setup the relationships and support needed for your exporting journey. There will also be plenty of networking breaks for you to develop new business relationships, opening the door to new opportunities.

Click here to view the full agenda, secure tickets and find out further information.

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The Liverpool City Region business community will be particularly intrigued by the chancellors announcements in Wednesday’s budget.

Posted by Paul Cherpeau

Chief Executive

Tue 15th, Mar

The Liverpool City Region business community will be particularly intrigued by the chancellors announcements in Wednesday’s budget. The shadow of a potential Brexit, a weak pound abroad and the internal divisions within the Conservative Party have put the Chancellor in arguably his weakest position since the start of the Coalition government in 2010. The austerity announced in November’s Autumn Statement was relatively limited, but may well now be felt in full force in this budget.

Skills

This budget, taking place during National Apprenticeship Week, and must provide greater detail of how the government will manage and distribute apprenticeship funding for business.

Further education, not just in Liverpool but across the UK, is under extreme financial pressures impacting on local colleges’ ability to deliver the quality demanded by government. Reforms to the funding of apprenticeships have already begun with the introduction of the apprenticeship levy for larger organisations but there is still a lack of clarity over what role SMEs are expected to take in providing training and apprenticeships - after all SMEs are the majority of our membership and together make up the largest set of employers in Liverpool. There remains much uncertainty concerning how businesses will access apprenticeships beyond August 2017, when the current funding regime will cease and the chancellor should be clear on what happens next.

Business Rates Reform

The door has been opened for business rates reform but for too long has appeared to be unattainable. Devolution has created an opportunity for reform here in Liverpool City Region but the focus to date has been on who gets to keep and spend business rates, rather than reforming the valuation, collection and rate-setting system. The long-awaited reform must be fair and provide safeguards to businesses that rates will not simply be seen as a cash cow to plug future funding gaps by local authorities. The Government should include local businesses through the Chambers of Commerce to shape and design their proposed changes to business rate retention so unintended impacts and consequences don't disturb the fragile economic recovery in Liverpool City Region.

Northern Powerhouse

Northern Powerhouse remains a consistently stated brand without a clear product. Whilst transport infrastructure has been mooted as the biggest tangible opportunity for the Northern Powerhouse little detail has emerged of the real projects required.  Liverpool 2 requires freight links and Lime Street needs regenerating so it can accommodate faster and more frequent services, while an announcement that includes the Liverpool Link in High speed rail plans is also overdue.

Tax simplification

Businesses are increasingly burdened with a complex and punishing tax regime that places increasing burdens on their ability to succeed. Pensions auto-enrolment, the National Living Wage, the apprenticeship levy, quarterly tax reporting and a hike in Insurance Premium Tax have all placed added costs and administrative burdens on companies whilst hikes in dividend tax and restrictions on pensions allowance have inhibited entrepreneurship.

A commitment to deliver no further up-front business taxes for the remainder of this Parliament would be welcomed as there is a growing fear in the Liverpool business community that regulation and administrative changes  are becoming a very real and damaging obstacle to investment and growth and, by proxy, jobs creation in The region.

Enable a supportive culture at HMRC

Taxation is already complex, yet businesses are increasingly frustrated by the dwindling resources and conduct of the taxmen and women at HMRC. The prevalence of a punitive approach to business impedes Liverpool business communities confidence that they are compliant with the plethora of legislation. Rather than a target-driven enforcement culture, investment in providing genuine business support and improving the tax collection processes would be a warmly welcomed improvement to HMRC’s function.

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Stephen Hannigan, Corporate Development Manager at Warrant Group has lived and worked in the Middle East. Here he gives some insight and advice into exporting to the region.

Posted by Stephen Hannigan

Corporate Development Manager, Warrant Group

  • T: 0151 955 0600
  • E: enquiries@warrant-group.com
Mon 14th, Mar

The Middle East is a culturally and socially diverse region with a lot to offer UK exporters. Its customs processes are fairly complex compared with other parts of the world but with effective supply chain expertise and local knowledge, exciting opportunities are there for the taking.

Has the importer got the necessary authority to import?  Don't fall at the first hurdle, make sure that your importer is registered!

You'd be surprised how often this is not the case, especially among new-to-the-market importers offering great deals!

Do the imported goods need to be registered with a ministry, health department/municipality before release?

Different countries and regions have many local requirements and without the necessary approvals, imported goods will not be released from customs. Be aware that the documentation process in the Middle East is still largely paper based; documents are inspected and rubber-stamped manually rather than being processed electronically.

Best time to export?

The Middle East weekend is a Friday/Saturday so ensure freight arrives on a Saturday evening or Sunday morning to prevent excessive dwell time at customs. And, just like Chinese New Year where productivity in the world's factory slows, be aware of national celebrations including Ramadam, Eid and the Arabic New Year.

Are there any cross selling or brand limitations?  In some territories there will be an authorised importer for a brand, if you wish to import products for general sale or use in a project you may need to get a Non Objection Certificate (NOC) from the licence holder.

Is it necessary to label the goods in Arabic? This is especially relevant for goods such as foodstuffs and cosmetics etc.

Where should I ship to? Ideally export to the nearest port of arrival and let the importer handled the onward journey to limit your liabilities. Weigh up the pros and cons of exporting to a hub region, bearing in mind onward transportation costs and delays through multiple customs clearances.

Are there any rules saying it is necessary to use specific ports, airport or carriers?

Importers often have specific requirements for duty exemption in certain industries. For example importation of duty exempt goods for Abu Dhabi must only be done at Abu Dhabi International Airport or seaport - if you try and import at Dubai World Central Airports, you'll be liable for five per cent duty.

Are there any new or forthcoming legislation/regulatory changes to be aware of?

At the moment, there is no VAT in the Middle East but this could change with talk about a proposed VAT levy in the United Arab Emirates of anywhere between 3% and 5% but this still to be confirmed.

Additionally, extra duty levies are often imposed if the product being imported could be sourced locally - there is a lot of industry in the Middle East, from textiles to engineering.

And finally, what about the weather? Never underestimate the obvious! I can clearly remember a container full of foodstuffs left on the quay during the summer; the smell was horrendous. It all depends on the product but with temperatures soaring to 45 degrees Celsius and above, goods left in a metal container can quickly deteriorate. Consider the need for a refrigerated container, known as a reefer.

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The ATA Carnet system covers 85+ countries and territories and is always challenged to maintain consistency amongst those economies while recognizing that each customs authority has the legal right to impose country-specific requirements.

Posted by Leslie August

Director - Boomerang Carnets LTD

Fri 11th, Mar

This Top Ten list points out the most glaring new requirements as well as important expansion developments.

10 – ATA Carnets & TIBs Officially Exempt from Filing EEI in US – No Penalties Imposed

Until Census published the exemption in the Federal Register, ATA Carnet users were to be penalized for failure to file the Electronic Export Information (EEI) with most carnet shipments. This would have essentially halted all carnet shipments to the U.S. since foreign carnet holders including those from the U.K., would not have been able to file EEIs. U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and the U.S. Census Bureau worked to EXEMPT ATA Carnets (and TIBs) from filing Electronic Export Information (EEI) into the Automated Export System (AES) reinforcing the worldwide benefits of relief from duties and taxes for temporary admissions.

9 - Mongolia Accepts Commercial Samples, Validates ATA Carnet System

Mongolia validated the financial security of the ATA Carnet system by accepting commercial samples under ATA Carnet. A carnet country since April 2004, Mongolia expanded their participation to accept carnets for Commercial Samples. Previously they were only signatories to the Professional Equipment and Exhibitions and Fairs conventions.

8 - Belgium Issues New Replacement Carnet Rules, Reinforces Expiration Dates

Belgium’s shift to making carnet extensions more difficult is one indication that carnet countries continue to reinforce the requirement to re-export goods in compliance with expiration dates. Belgium's National Guaranteeing Association, the Fédération des Chambres de Commerce et d’Industrie de Belgique, announced a change in procedures regarding Replacement Carnets, sometimes referred to as carnet extension. The Belgian customs is undergoing a reorganization process and seeking the approval for a Replacement Carnet can become difficult as a result.

7 – Hand Carried Goods into China Require Registration, Three-Day Rule Imposed

Adding to the carnet countries requiring pre-registration due to increased security concerns, the Chinese carnet authorities have issued new regulations governing the entry of hand-carried goods into China. The new procedure outlines the process of registering those hand-carried items with the Council for the Promotion of International Trade which is the Chinese carnet guaranteeing association.

6 – Indonesia Joins the ATA Carnet System, Expands Carnets in Australasia

This major economy in the Australasia region is a welcome addition to the ATA Carnet system. It was announced on March 27, 2015 that Indonesia would join the ATA Carnet system and began accepting carnets May 15, 2015.  Indonesia is the 85th country/territory to join the ATA Carnet system.

5 – Airport Maps Published for Carnet Users, Get Help Going Against the Flow

Since airports are not designed to have customs easily available to a departing passenger, carnet users can feel as if they are "going against the flow" when they need to get a carnet validated upon departure. The "carnet-customized airport maps" help a carnet user navigate through an airport to locate a customs official and get a carnet validated for departure. Note that these maps are available only on the U.S. boomerang carnets site at this time.

4 – UK Adopts US Carnet-Issuing Technology, Quill Pens Retired

Automation of the carnet process in the U.K. has lagged behind the U.S. until now, for at least 20 years. U.K. ATA Carnets are now available online from the Liverpool Chamber of Commerce (LCC) from anywhere in the U.K. LCC has partnered with a U.S. carnet provider to deliver a fully-automated, ATA Carnet application solution that is highly-efficient for the carnet applicant.

3 – Turkey Imposes Sticky Requirements on Carnet Users, Unnecessary Hurdles Should Be Rescinded

The “devil is in the details” when getting temporary imports into Turkey. Turkey accepts the international customs document, the ATA Carnet, for commercial samples, professional equipment and trade fairs and exhibitions. However, recently, Turkish customs issued new requirements that will cause problems for U.K. exporters and carnet holders if caught unawares. Unfortunately, while the ATA Carnet is intended to facilitate temporary imports for commercial and cultural purposes, these regulatory impositions create unnecessary administrative hurdles for users.

2 – Qatar May Be Next Carnet Country, Implementation is Imminent

Following the leadership of Bahrain, Qatar has recently appointed a national guaranteeing association for ATA Carnets, taking a key step toward issuing and accepting ATA Carnets. The National Guaranteeing Association is the Qatar Chamber. The remaining hurdle to Qatar becoming a fully-functional ATA Carnet country is implementation of the issuing and acceptance functions by Qatar customs. Qatar would become the 6th Middle Eastern country to join the system including Bahrain, Lebanon, Iran, Israel and the United Arab Emirates.

1 – Brazil Poised to Accept Carnets for Olympics, Most Significant Addition to Carnet System since Mexico

Rio 2016 is positioned to be the international sporting event that opens Brazil to long-term simplification of temporary admission processes there. For a historically closed economy, adoption of the carnet system would substantially reduce the costs and hurdles associated with temporary admission to Brazil. In anticipation of the Olympics, Brazil is quickly moving toward ATA Carnet acceptance and issuing to facilitate temporary imports. Once the rules for treatment of import licenses is approved it is expected Brazil will quickly announce an effective date for the acceptance of carnets. CNI, the Brazilian national guaranteeing association has already met all its obligations and is prepared to act quickly with Brazilian customs to bring ATA Carnets into force.

To get regular updates on changes affecting the use of ATA Carnets, subscribe to our newsletter or check back on our blog posts.

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Defined Benefit Pensions, Reduction to the Lifetime Allowance from 6 April 2016

Posted by Winston Ruddick

Independent Financial Advisor

  • T: 0151 243 1233
  • E: wr@dsg.uk.com
Wed 02nd, Mar

The standard Lifetime Allowance (LTA) will reduce from £1.25 million to £1 million from 6 April 2016. It will remain at this level for tax years 2016/17 and 2017/18. From 6 April 2018 the standard LTA will be indexed annually in line with the Consumer Prices Index (CPI).

Tax Year   Lifetime Allowance
2015/16     £1.25 million
2016/17     £1 million
2017/18     £1 million
2018/19     £1 million + CPI

How do I calculate the capital value of my defined benefit pension?
The capital value of your defined benefit pension is calculated as follows: Annual Pension x 20 + Pension Commencement Lump Sum

When will the reduction in the standard LTA affect defined benefit pension members?
A standard LTA of £1 million will have an effect when you take benefits from your pension on or after 6 April 2016.

What happens if my pension benefits are more than the standard LTA?
If your pension benefits exceed the LTA then a tax charge, known as the Lifetime Allowance Charge will apply.

The LTA charge is 25% if the excess is taken as scheme pension and 55% if the excess is taken as a lump sum. You will only pay a tax charge on the amount by which you exceed the LTA, not on your entire pension or lump sum.

Fixed Protection 2016 and Individual Protection 2016
The government announced that it is to offer new protections to members who could be impacted by the reduction of LTA to £1 million;
- Fixed Protection 2016 (FP2016).
- Individual Protection 2016 (IP2016).

Applications for FP2016 and IP2016 will be online using a new HMRC online self-service tool, which is expected to be available from June 2016.

There will be specific restrictions which apply if you elect to take Fixed Protection 2016, the most important restrictions will be;
- No further contributions into a money purchase pension arrangement.
- No further build-up of benefits in a Defined Benefit that exceeds “relevant benefit accrual”.

For most Defined Benefit Pensions “relevant benefit accrual” is the percentage by which the CPI (Consumer Prices Index) increases in a year. If the increase in your Defined Benefit Pension is greater than this you will have exceeded “relevant benefit accrual” and as such Fixed Protection 2016 will be lost.

What should I do if I am worried about exceeding the LTA?
- Request an up to date benefit statement from your pension scheme.
- Calculate the capital value of your Defined Benefit Pension (Annual Pension x 20 + Pension Commencement Lump Sum).
- Contact us to discuss what options are available to you to reduce any potential tax charge.

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Posted by Andy Whitehead

Director, AMPW Ltd

Wed 24th, Feb

Mental Toughness is an agenda fast gaining momentum across the sports, education and business worlds. It is defined as:

….a quality which determines, in some part, how effectively individuals perform when exposed to stressors, pressure and challenge….irrespective of the prevailing situation. (Clough & Strycharczyk 2006)

‘Resilience’ is a word often used when discussing Mental Toughness – Resilience can be described as:

‘The ability to recover quickly from change, setback or misfortune’

My simple view is that people with strong mental toughness can (and do) make excellent leaders. The question often asked is whether you can develop stronger mental toughness?…thankfully the answer is yes!

The four key components of mental toughness are:

•   Challenge – an individual’s approach to challenge (or change) and whether they see problems/obstacles or opportunities

•   Control – The extent someone feels they are in control – some feel external factors control everything where others have a strong sense of self-control and influence over external activities

•   Commitment – The extent to which an individual persists with tasks and goals – either with a strong focus on delivery or the other end of the scale, easily distracted and diverted from the end goal.

•   Confidence – Individuals high in confidence have the self-belief to complete successfully tasks that may be considered too difficult by individuals with similar abilities but lower confidence.

Leaders who develop their mental toughness will deliver better results in terms of performance, quality and the bottom line…..maybe more organisations should be focusing more development activity to the mental Toughness of their leadership?

If you want to be more resilient, have greater confidence and deliver increased performance then join me for an exclusive master class on Friday 1st April, 10.30 - 16.30 at Liverpool & Sefton Chambers of Commerce. Click here to find out more and secure your place.

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New Requirements Raise Concerns

Posted by Leslie August

Director - Boomerang Carnets LTD

Thu 18th, Feb

The “devil is in the details” when getting temporary imports into Turkey. Turkey accepts the international customs document, the ATA Carnet, for commercial samples, professional equipment and trade fairs and exhibitions.However, recently, Turkish customs issued new requirements that will cause problems for U.K. exporters and carnet holders if caught unawares. Unfortunately, while the ATA Carnet is intended to facilitate temporary imports for commercial and cultural purposes, these regulatory impositions create unnecessary administrative hurdles for users.

The obstructionist requirements are regarding of use of ATA Carnets presented to Turkish customs in the areas of:1) Authorized Representatives, 2) Temporary Admissions with Partial Relief from duties and taxesand 3) Penalties associated with misuse of the carnet.

In addition to explicitly naming the Holder’s Authorized Representative and providing a signature, that representative must obtain a Power of Attorney approved by the Turkish Consulate. Turkish customs has made it clear that this is required in spite of lack of any mention of such a requirement in the international convention under which carnets are managed.

Turkish customs also clarifies that items subject to “Partial Relief” will carry a duty rate of 3% monthly. For further details, exporters are referred to an authorized Customs broker. Carnet specialists are concerned about any requirements that depend on the use of a customs broker since the original intent of the ATA Carnet was a do-it-yourself document.

Finally, penalties are outlined for misuse of the carnet. They are steep for goods re-exported more than 2 months after expiration. The is fine is two times the bonded value of the goods.

While ATA Carnet authorities are addressing these unnecessary trade barriers directly with Turkish customs, exporters must comply with the requirements. It is our opinion that these regulations are in direct conflict with the intent of the ATA Carnet system and that customs authorities already have adequate protection,in the form of a financial guarantee, without imposing limitations that make it harder to temporarily import.

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But where is the similar push for disability in the workplace?

Posted by Tom Dowling

Tom Dowling, Editor of the Liverpool-based charity health and disability newspaper, All Together NOW!(www.alltogethernow.org.uk)

Tue 09th, Feb

More than 40 years ago, while lying paralysed in a hospital bed in Southport’s spinal injuries unit, my Indian neurosurgeon gave me a few words of advice:

‘Strive to be as flexible as you can – physically and mentally,’ he said, puffing on his pipe. ‘Happiness and fulfilment are linked to attitudes – yours and the people you will meet along the way . . . and especially employers.

‘Disabled people can still make valuable contributions. We all just need to think a bit differently, that’s all.’ 

Kookal Krishnan had a lifetime’s experience in helping paralysed people get back to ‘normality’.

But he was frustrated that most of the people he and his team had helped could not find the same support with employers.

A few months earlier I had the world at my feet. I’d just finished my reporter’s training and was looking forward to Fleet Street.

But while returning with three other 20-year-old friends from the ultimate road trip to Everest, we were attacked by armed bandits in Iran. A bullet severed my spinal cord and left me paralysed from the chest.

It could have been the end of my short-lived journalistic career. But within weeks of my injury Dave Williams, the boss of the now defunct Ellesmere Port News, offered me a job. Just one snag, he said: “You’ll have to be flexible. We work on the first floor and there’s no lift. You will have to use a desk in the ground floor kitchen and use a bucket for a pee.”

It wasn’t perfect – back in the 70s everywhere had steps, and more steps – no ramps or dropped kerbs. But I’d been given a chance, and it soon led to a job on the ECHO where I worked for almost 30 years– proving to members of staff, including management, that taking on a disabled person can bring many benefits to a business.

It also helped me to earn enough to raise a family, to contribute to the local economy, and saved the Government hundreds of thousands of pounds in benefits.

All the evidence suggests there is a really strong business case for employing, and retaining, disabled staff.

So why are more than 2 MILLION disabled peoplenot getting the chance?

In a recent article in HR Magazine Alice Weightman, founder of recruitment consultancy Hanson Search, suggests that organisations often just don’t feel they know how to discuss disability . . .

If that’s the case, why not set up disability awareness courses for line managers and staff? That will help.

There’s lots of other help around, too. Check out the Government’s Disability Confident website (https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/disability-confident-campaign)

Acas has also launched an employers’ guide to disability discrimination (http://www.acas.org.uk/index.aspx?articleid=1859), which includes tips on recruitment advertising – how to write them and where to place them so that disabled people are most likely to see them.

Disability in the workplace is nothing to fear. All organisations, and especially those in the public sector, need to embrace it and reap the benefits of a truly diverse workforce. 

I’m certain that’s something my old guru, Kookal Krishnan, would have raised his pipe to.

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February 7th – February 15th

Posted by Ian Jones

Managing Director of Warrant Group

  • T: 0151 955 0627
Mon 01st, Feb

Chinese New Year poses one of the biggest annual challenges you'll face when working in the logistics sector.

China is essentially closed for business over this holiday period, meaning that planning ahead for stock surpluses and post-holiday lag as workers drip back to work is absolutely vital.

Great communication and forward planning can save you from possible complications during this time. Collaborating closely with clients and planning intimately with suppliers, carriers, airlines and sub-contractors will eliminate Supply Chain interruption.

Supply Chain Managers in 2016 need to plan for no production or shipments leaving China from late January and for reduced output during the first half of March 2016.

It is therefore prudent to analyse the key ingredients required for businesses wishing to maintain Supply Chain integrity during Chinese New Year.

Forecasting

Forecasting can be quite complex as it is dependent upon supplier numbers, geographical location and SKU data.

Factories will enter overdrive mode prior to Chinese New Year to meet delivery obligations prior to closing. Supply Chain Managers must be very specific on:

  • Production deadlines
  • Latest ship dates

Service providers likewise must communicate their client forecasts to carriers so as to avoid booking refusals and container availability bottlenecks. It is critical to liaise with suppliers to confirm exact numbers on an on-going basis at least two weeks prior to vessel departure. 

Increase Inventory

As a rule of thumb, receipts scheduled for March require 50% of that volume "shifting" to arrive in January and the remaining 50% for February's intake.

The net effect on stock migration sees January and February taking an additional 50% increase to counteract a significant drawdown reduction in March.

Warehouse Planning

Warehouse capacity and manpower planning for this seasonal fluctuation is essential.

Creating additional space where spare capacity is at a premium can be managed effectively by having a laser focus approach to creating more room by executing good housekeeping rules.

Manpower planning remains a conundrum between goods in, housekeeping, picking and loading. Tailoring receipts and dispatch activity, invariably by tweaking resource allocation, minimises any short-term disruption.

Changing Sourcing Strategy

Dual sourcing is a common solution. In other words instead of buying additional inventory look to other possible suppliers from different geographical locations, that aren't affected by the Chinese New Year closures, to bridge the gap to maintain a consistent and manageable product flow. 

Supply Chain Savvy

Incentivising slow moving stock and offering promotions can clearly help both revenue streams and warehouse space.

In summary the more time you take to understand the complexity of Chinese New Year, the better equipped you will be to mitigate its effect on your company's operations. 

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New regulations will come into effect from 1st April 2016

Posted by Jenny Stewart

Chief Executive of Liverpool & Sefton Chambers of Commerce

Wed 27th, Jan

On 1 April 2016 the National Living Wage will become law. The Government is urging businesses to prepare early for the changes and make sure they follow these four simple steps:

  • Know the correct rate of pay - £7.20 per hour for staff aged 25 and over
  • Find out which staff are eligible for the new rate
  • Update the company payroll in time for 1 April 2016
  • Communicate the changes to staff as soon as possible.

 

The National Living Wage will provide a direct boost to over one million workers in the UK this year – rewarding and providing security for working people.

By taking these measures, companies will be able to properly reward their staff and avoid falling foul of the law when it takes effect.

The new National Living Wage is a key part of the Government’s plan to continue to move to a higher wage, lower tax and lower welfare society, building a more productive country and giving families the security of well-paid work.

You can find out more by clicking here. Join the conversation on Twitter by following @bisgovuk and the hashtag #NationalLivingWage.

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